Online Reputation Management Means Knowing Where Your Secrets Are

Online Reputation Management Means Knowing Where Your Secrets Are

This will seem a little amusing right now, but some years ago I attended a high-level CEO management forum with about 800 C-suite types from all over the country involved in technology and/or the Internet in one way or another. The keynote speaker was then Attorney-General Elliot Spitzer. Yes, that Elliot Spitzer, and how apprapro to now be speaking of him in an online reputation article. Anyway, his opening remarks, which he often used in these keynotes, went like this: “First of all, I want to let all of you know that before I came in here today, I have already read all your emails.” [This brought lots of laughter, achieving his intention of opening with some humor.] He then went on to say, “Here’s the message I can give you for your business practices. If you can nod, don’t speak, if you can speak, don’t write, and if you have to write, don’t record or save.

You may recall that it is always discovery of EMAILS that brought down his targets and resulted in so many successful prosecutions for him that eventually led to him being elected governor of New York. Apparently, he forgot to follow his own advice. The basics of online reputation management new york is to NEVER put anything in an email that would make you feel bad if by some happenstance it appeared on the front page of your leading local or national newspaper. Isn’t it funny — no, not funny — how these emails, or other so-called secret documents seem to show up at the most unexpected times or in the most unexpected places.

Profiles Are For Viewer’s Eyes Only

It could have been a workplace disaster of incalculable proportions. But thankfully, Bridget’s professional reputation got by without a scratch.

Here’s the story as she tells it:

“Many of my co-workers are blocked from seeing my more ”social” moments on Facebook . . . such as the booze-fueled housewarming bash I threw a few months back. Not exactly something you want the bosses to see.

So imagine my horror when I saw a co-worker (who had full profile access) not only browsing through my party photos at work — but also showing them to someone who walked by!

Lucky for me, the person who saw it already was my Facebook friend. And that co-worker quickly realized that a social network faux pas had been committed.

I thought I had it under control because I used privacy settings. I trusted that co-worker with access, but I didn’t take into account that the pictures could be shared with others at work.

So the lesson learned goes two ways. First, assume that things you see are for your eyes only. It’s disrespectful to let the whole department huddle around your monitor to look at someone else’s profile.

And, of course, don’t assume bosses won’t see a photo just because you blocked their access. Unless you block all co-workers, someone at work could share it in the office. Nothing is 100 percent safe from being seen just because you use privacy settings.”

Niala has experienced this same problem, a little differently:

“I’ve had a few incidents with co-workers who aren’t on social networks but like to get into people’s business. Hey, we’re all journalists — it’s sort of a hallmark of the trade that we’re all nosy. But I have to draw the line when they are hovering over my computer, and, in some cases, asking me to click on things in people’s profiles. I’m not sure that I’ve done the best job telling them to back off. I usually just tell them they need to open their own account.”

For some reason, people who would never read an e-mail on your screen have no problem being social network voyeurs. Sound familiar?

One more “secret” hideout that we’ve seen come back to haunt people, and companies: too many employees fail to erase or encrypt sensitive data on their mobile devices before tossing them out. To prove this point, one known to us, a university research team recently purchased 161 discarded handheld devices from online auction sites and secondhand outlets.

One in five (20%) contained details about salaries, company finances, business plans, or board meetings. A Blackberry once owned by the European sales director of a major Japenese firm, for instance, had the goods on company clients as well as the executive’s bank account numbers — along with his car make and registration

 

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